HomeFeatured PostsBoston: A Complete Guide

Boston: A Complete Guide

Boston, the fruit of love between America and Europe, evokes mixed feelings at first glance. Think about it: the oldest city in New England. From this city began the development of the continent and from it – the war for the independence of the United States. The city of Irish and Italians, seething with young blood, hordes of students who come here every year to gnaw the granite of science at Harvard, MIT, and BU. A recognized center for science, business, and education, wherein hot weather the houses smell of caramel. The cradle of the nation, where cultures and characters, stories and destinies are tightly intertwined. Well, where else can you learn the origins of American culture, if not in the most European city in the United States!

Transport In Boston

To get to the east coast from Minsk, you will have to fly with a transfer. LufthansaDeltaAirFrance, and Aeroflot operate regular flights to Boston at relatively reasonable prices. Ticket prices may vary depending on the season, so keep your eyes open and periodically drop in on Skyscanner.

If you are traveling to Boston from neighboring states, we advise you to take a closer look at the bus service: buses will cost you an order of magnitude cheaper than trains, and they run more often. From bus carriers, we can safely recommend Mega BusPeterPan, and Greyhound.

The easiest way to get from Boston’s Logan Airport to the city is by one of the free shuttle buses: the Silver Line (SL1) will quickly and comfortably take you to South Station (red line), and the Massport shuttle will take you to Airport station (blue line) without noise and dust. For more information see here.

With public transport in Boston, everything is interesting: all its types (subways, trams, trolleybuses, buses, ferries, trains in zone 1A) are part of the state’s public transport system and therefore are called simply “T” ([ty]).

There are several ways to pay for the T in Boston. You can purchase a CharlieTicket – a one-time ticket ($ 2.1) – or use the 1-Day LinkPass ($ 12). If you decide to extend your visit to a week – a weekly 7-Day LinkPass ($ 19) is at your service. Be careful: in addition to the public transport “T” in the city, there are also private carriers, on board of which your ticket will not be available and you will have to pay with cash.

The Boston Metro, the oldest in the country, was opened in 1898. The metro system has both underground and surface stations. Moreover, it is important to know that at all underground stations the train makes stops automatically, and on the surface – only on demand. The Boston Metro operates from 5 am to 12:45 am.

You can always rely on a taxi in Boston if it’s the ubiquitous Uber or the local Cabbies Cab.

Hubway city ​​bike rental is a possible, but not a very budgetary alternative to city transport: a daily membership will cost you $ 6, a three-day one – $ 12, and a monthly one – $ 20. In addition, the counter winds an additional penalty for rides longer than 30 minutes.

Locals advise against renting a car. And not at all because it is terribly difficult to find parking in the city, it’s just that the original layout of the streets of Boston was based on cattle trails (this is not a joke), and it is much easier to navigate here on foot.

Accommodation In Boston

Boston is not a cheap city, including in terms of accommodation: an average hotel here will cost you $ 100-190 per night. However, there are several places where you can save money if you are ready to exchange fashionability and convenience for fun and interesting company.

Friend Street Hostel (234 Friend St) is for those who like to always be in the epicenter of events: the location of the hostel allows you to walk to the very central city center in 5 minutes, and the cost of a bed will start from $ 30 per night. Also at your disposal: regular parties, 24-hour reception, kitchen, individual locker, and a modest breakfast. Attention! There are always a lot of people here, so you should think about booking in advance.

40Berkeley (40 Berkeley St) is a pleasant location in the southern part of the city, combining the affordability of a hostel with the comfort of a hotel. The price tag for a basic single room starts at $ 45 per night, for a double room – from $ 60. Minus: bathrooms are shared here – one male and one female on each floor.

One of the cheapest accommodation options in downtown Boston is the HI-Boston Hostel (19 Stuart St). The price for a bed here ranges from $ 31.65 to $ 52.49, depending on the day of the week and the number of beds in the room (from 4 to 8 pieces). At your service: 24-hour reception, free Wi-Fi, breakfast, hairdryer in every bathroom.

The Whitman House Inn (17 Worcester St, Cambridge) is a classic family-run four-room hotel located away from the bustling city center and noisy parties. Here you will be taken care of like a family: soft bedding, hearty breakfast, and free Wi-Fi. In addition, the metro station is a 5-minute walk away.

However, who said that it is obligatory to book a hotel? Through the legendary Craigslist, you can easily find accommodation from Boston locales!

Places to Visit in Boston

In addition to its own historic center, Boston is “girded” with no less colorful outskirts and suburbs. It plays into your hands – here, the brick-red houses of colonial America have an alternative in the form of Little Italy, the fashionable Harvard campus, and concrete-glass skyscrapers, which means the kaleidoscope effect is guaranteed!

You won’t be able to get lost when exploring Boston’s historic center: the Freedom Trail is laid out right under the feet of tourists. Following the red-brick Freedom Trail, you will be able to independently explore 16 sights that have witnessed the history of the city. The route begins at Boston Common and follows the Massachusetts State Capitol and other historical monuments (read – through the entire city center) directly to the world’s oldest floating sailing ship, USS Constitution. The length of the route is 4 km, so plan enough time!

Copley Square (560 Boylston St) – square – mosaic. The variegated architectural ensemble of this place will tell you about the city, if not all, then a lot. Admire the old churches Trinity Church and Old South Church, and see the inside and outside of the Boston Public Library, built in the style of the Italian Renaissance palaces. Check out a huge smartphone stuck in the ground, it is also the tallest skyscraper in Boston – John Hancock Tower. In addition, the famous Boston Marathon finishes in the square, there are several plaques and almost always something interesting happens!

Visit the legendary Fenway Park (4 Yawkey Way) – a must-do event! This atmospheric stadium is the oldest sports facility in the United States, which opened its doors as early as 1912. The famous Red Socks baseball team plays here at home, and it is considered a good omen to eat a hot dog there.

For harmony and romance, go to the South End. An area of ​​Boston, almost entirely built up with cute Victorian red bricks and buried in numerous parks and squares. Here you will find galleries, family restaurants, and flea markets, in a word, everything is like in the Old World. Well, getting here in March-April, during the magnolia season, is generally priceless!

A visit to the Museum of Bad Art (55 Davis Square, Somerville) will give you a completely new experience. Collected here are works by artists who are literally “too bad to ignore.” The museum is located on the basement floor of the Somerville Theater: with a purchase of a movie ticket, the museum’s exposition can be viewed for free!

The Boston “Emerald Necklace” is the name given to a chain of parkland and green spaces with a total area of ​​4.5 km², literally encircling the city. The original layout of the project dates back to the colonial period of Boston’s development, and crowds of joggers and other outdoor sports enthusiasts still say thank you. The necklace includes Boston Common – the oldest urban park in the United States – Olmsted Park and many others.

An incredibly atmospheric square hides from you between Church of Christ, Scientist (250 Massachusetts Ave), and Prudential Center (800 Boylston St). Come here in the evening: the strict outlines of the colonnade, the rustle of the water of a huge reflecting pool, and the lights of the big city will effortlessly snatch your declaration of love for Boston!

At 4-8 Battery St. you will find a typical three-story house, better known as All Saints Way. Thanks to its pious owner, Peter Baldassari, the entire space of the house and the adjacent territory is covered with figures, pictures, and other images of Catholic saints, which the owner has been collecting for over 50 years. If you find the owner of the collection at home – feel free to ask for a free tour!

Justifying its own status as an American center for science and education, Boston hosts one of the most impressive science and technology museum venues in the world: the Museum of Science (1 Science Park). On the territory of the museum, there are more than 700 interactive exhibits, as well as a zoo, terrarium, planetarium, and much more. Here adults turn into children, rediscovering physics and chemistry, astronomy and biology. The sea of ​​cognitive pleasure will cost you $ 23 excluding additional fees.

Walking through the northern part of the city, look for a plaque at the intersection of Commercial and Foster St. Here in 1919 Boston was flooded with molasses: a 2 million gallon cistern burst in a nearby liquor factory, and a two-story wave of sugar syrup covered the streets of the city. Locals claim that even today the houses here smell of caramel!

At historic Harvard Square (18 Brattle St # 352, Cambridge) in Cambridge, past and future merge. Here you can enjoy the atmosphere of a typical American campus to your heart’s content: enjoy coffee in one of the great variety of premium street cafes, hang out with students of America’s oldest university, listen to street musicians … And all this is framed by old colonial buildings made of red brick.

Boston and its environs have their own unit of measure, Smooth, which is approximately 1.7 m. The measure was invented by MIT students in the 1950s. of the last century and named after a long-suffering freshman who tried to get into the student fraternity: as a boy, they measured the Harvard Bridge, connecting Boston with Cambridge, concluding that the bridge is 364.4 Smoot + one ear. The markings are still painted on the bridge.

If you have no plans for Wednesday night, join the open house night at the Boston University Observatory (725 Commonwealth Avenue). You will be able to admire the night sky through a telescope and learn a lot of interesting things about our Universe, and absolutely for free. The event starts every Wednesday (in clear weather) at 19:30 in the autumn-winter months and at 20:30 in the spring-summer months.

Fans of urban art will appreciate Richard B. Rico Modica Way (Central Square, Cambridge) in Cambridge: an open 24/7 space, you cannot call it a “gallery” of graffiti artists. Everyone draws!

Fort Independence (Harborwalk), a monumental historical fortification, along with an embankment around Pleasure Bay, is your ideal place for walking in fine weather: salty wind in your hair, the sound of the ocean, and revived history of America! Well, if you are lucky enough to taxi here from May to October, you have every chance of getting on a free tour of the fort.

When you’re finally tired of overland routes, catch the special ferry at Long Wharf and head to the islands in Boston Harbor. The Boston Harbor National Park recreation area unites 34 islands, 11 of which are open to the public. Beaches, ancient lighthouses, military fortifications, and even a former prison await you for only $ 17 (student fare – $ 12).

Snacks & Fast Food in Boston

You can find delicious hot sandwiches at Mike & Petty’s (12 Church St): this tiny four-chair eatery has some of the best breakfasts in town. Sandwich prices range from $ 7 to $ 12, but trust me, it’s worth it!

Delicious croissants, tarts, and cakes, along with aromatic coffee, await you at Tatte Bakery & Cafe (70 Charles St, Boston, 318 Third St, Cambridge). The atmosphere and the audience here are conducive to communication, and the freshest pastries will not leave anyone indifferent!

UBURGER (636 Beacon St., 1022 Commonwealth Ave, 360 Huntington Ave) is a classic American burger chain with an impeccable reputation. On the menu, you will find burgers, sandwiches, hot dogs, onion rings, fries, and much more.

Taste the best Boston ramen at Pikaichi (1 Brighton Ave): hearty soup in this cozy atmosphere will cost you $ 5-8.

Flour, a traditional coffee and bakery chain (12 Farnsworth St., 1595 Washington St, Boston, 190 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge), comes to the rescue if you suddenly crave something sweet. The prices are pleasantly surprising: delicious homemade cookies will cost you only $ 1.

Cafes & Restaurants in Boston

Once you reach the northern part of the city, you will definitely have time to work up your appetite. And just in time! This part of Boston is called “Little Italy” for a reason: restaurants of Italian cuisine for every taste and color are at your service. We recommend the Galleria Umberto Pizzeria (289 Hanover St). Here you will find authentic Sicilian pizza at the most affordable price: only $ 1.55 for a huge slice. For dessert, have delicious Arancini rice balls for $ 3! Please note: Umberto’s only accepts cache.

Nud Pob Thai Cuisine (738 Commonwealth Ave) is a cute Thai restaurant famous for its original variations of classic Thai cuisine. The atmosphere here is reminiscent of a noisy student canteen, and large portions and an average price tag ($ 8-10 per serving) will compete with fast food establishments.

Sportello (348 Congress St) is a modern interpretation of the classic American diner: minimalist design, open kitchen, and lightweight Italian cuisine. The menu includes soups, salads, and pasta.

At Thinking Cup (165 Tremont St, 236 Hanover St, 85 Newbury St) you can always count on coffee teas, sandwiches and desserts, regular or gluten fries, on-site or to go. This is such pleasant predictability.

Miracle of Science Bar & Grill (321 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge) is a great geek-chic place in Cambridge. A menu is written in chalk on huge blackboard-themed cocktails and hearty lunches – the atmosphere here is extremely pleasing! The bar’s audience is mostly MIT students willing to confirm that smart is the new sexy! Beer here will cost about $ 5, and for dinner, you will pay an average of $ 8-15.

Chinatown Cafe (262 Harrison Ave) will delight you with the price-to-quantity ratio without sacrificing quality. You can pay only with cash.

While visiting Cambridge, check out Felipe’s Taqueria (21 Brattle St, Cambridge). Exemplary Mexican cuisine is here for you in the most budgetary way: the price tag for dishes does not exceed $ 10, and the bar starts at $ 2.5. In the warm season, visitors take tables right on the roof of the establishment.

Chocolatier LA Burdick Chocolate (220 Clarendon St) claims they have the best hot chocolate in Boston! Take on the challenge – these guys have been serving hot drinks and other chocolates for 30 years. Bonus – you can make delicious food with you because there is a shop at the cafe.

Lovers of sweets will certainly visit the legendary Boston bakery Mike’s Pastry (300 Hanover St), famous for its cannoli with cream. The institution first opened its doors in 1946 and since then has earned the recognition of both locals and former US President Bill Clinton. On average, the prices for cakes here range from $ 3-5.

Bars In Boston

Once you reach the northern part of the city, you will definitely have time to work up your appetite. And just in time! This part of Boston is called “Little Italy” for a reason: restaurants of Italian cuisine for every taste and color are at your service. We recommend the Galleria Umberto Pizzeria (289 Hanover St). Here you will find authentic Sicilian pizza at the most affordable price: only $ 1.55 for a huge slice. For dessert, have delicious Arancini rice balls for $ 3! Please note: Umberto’s only accepts cache.

Nud Pob Thai Cuisine (738 Commonwealth Ave) is a cute Thai restaurant famous for its original variations of classic Thai cuisine. The atmosphere here is reminiscent of a noisy student canteen, and large portions and an average price tag ($ 8-10 per serving) will compete with fast food establishments.

Sportello (348 Congress St) is a modern interpretation of the classic American diner: minimalist design, open kitchen, and lightweight Italian cuisine. The menu includes soups, salads, and pasta.

At Thinking Cup (165 Tremont St, 236 Hanover St, 85 Newbury St) you can always count on coffee teas, sandwiches and desserts, regular or gluten fries, on-site or to go. This is such pleasant predictability.

Miracle of Science Bar & Grill (321 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge) is a great geek-chic place in Cambridge. A menu is written in chalk on huge blackboard-themed cocktails and hearty lunches – the atmosphere here is extremely pleasing! The bar’s audience is mostly MIT students willing to confirm that smart is the new sexy! Beer here will cost about $ 5, and for dinner, you will pay an average of $ 8-15.

Chinatown Cafe (262 Harrison Ave) will delight you with the price-to-quantity ratio without sacrificing quality. You can pay only with cash.

While visiting Cambridge, check out Felipe’s Taqueria (21 Brattle St, Cambridge). Exemplary Mexican cuisine is here for you in the most budgetary way: the price tag for dishes does not exceed $ 10, and the bar starts at $ 2.5. In the warm season, visitors take tables right on the roof of the establishment.

Chocolatier LA Burdick Chocolate (220 Clarendon St) claims they have the best hot chocolate in Boston! Take on the challenge – these guys have been serving hot drinks and other chocolates for 30 years. Bonus – you can make delicious food with you because there is a shop at the cafe.

Lovers of sweets will certainly visit the legendary Boston bakery Mike’s Pastry (300 Hanover St), famous for its cannoli with cream. The institution first opened its doors in 1946 and since then has earned the recognition of both locals and former US President Bill Clinton. On average, the prices for cakes here range from $ 3-5.

Clubs In Boston

Latin heat awaits you at Mojitos (48 Winter St): the fiery rhythms of salsa, refreshing caipirinha and sangria are here for you from Thursday to Sunday. Don’t you dance Latina? Then come early – at 19:30 on Fridays and Saturdays, there are salsa lessons. You can also dine: the locals claim that guacamole can be eaten here with your fingers.

If you’re looking for a chic sparkle, check out the Royale (279 Tremont St). The parties here are quite different from other nightlife venues in the city: as if you teleported to Vegas or Miami. Luxurious decorations, a huge dance floor, dress code, and only famous DJs. Concerts happen. Entry prices can go up to $ 30.

At Storyville Lounge (90 Exeter St) you can listen to live jazz, have a cocktail or two, and even dine. The institution opens its doors on Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Admission is free, but bar cocktails start at $ 11.

The Tunnel (100 Stuart St) is open 5 days a week (except Sun and Mon) and never disappoints famous DJs, polished audience, lighting effects, everything to do. The only thing that can darken your evening here is a blow to your wallet: the entrance fee can be as high as $ 20, and the price tag for cocktails at the bar starts at $ 10.

The town of Toad (1912 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge) in Cambridge is hidden behind a well-completely inconspicuous sign: all week there is live music, a bar, and only a good mood.

Shopping In Boston

The USA is a shopping mecca! In order not to run out of money, remember that here the price of the goods on the price tag and at the checkout will be different: it’s all about the sales tax, which is added to the cost of the goods in favor of the state in which the purchase was made. In Massachusetts, this tax is 6.25%.

Discount giants Marshalls (500 Boylston St, 126 Brookline Ave) and TJMaxx (350 Washington St) will delight all lovers of freebies and brands. Here are presented things (as well as shoes, cosmetics, and household goods) of American and European brands, from mass market to premium class with discounts from 20 to 60%. Fly in!

Tired of huge department stores and boring brands, head to SoWa Open Market (460 Harrison Ave), an open-air craft and farm flea market where you can not only buy unique hand-made crafts and vegetables from the garden but also be creative in various artistic workshops, sample local delicacies and hang out with the creative community. Sowa Open Market is waiting for you every Sunday from 1.05 to 30.10.

Find the secret store BODEGA (6 Clearway St) and become the hero of one of the urban legends of the United States: you will not see a chic shop window or a luminous sign – the entrance to the store is hidden behind a soda machine of a small grocery deli and is waiting for the “elite” to find it.

Newbury Street in Back Bay is the case when the street looks much cooler than the shops on it! The street, built in the style of a French boulevard, has eight blocks of boutiques, salons, and charming restaurants for every taste. This place was once the most prestigious area to live in (1890), but today people flock here in search of brands like American Apparel, Banana Republic, and Juicy Couture.

When walking through downtown Boston, be sure to check out the fair at Quincy Market (4 S Market St). Granite on the outside – brick on the inside, this historic market attracts endless rows of souvenir shops and cafes for both locals and tourists.

Tea lovers will appreciate the vintage tealux (0 Brattle St, Cambridge) on Harvard Square. A huge selection of teas, cozy dishes, accessories, and helpful sales boys at the counter are guaranteed to cheer you up!

Similar Travel Guides

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Recent posts

Guides