HomeIndiaAndamanCellular Jail: Monument to Struggle for Freedom

Cellular Jail: Monument to Struggle for Freedom

Cellular Jail, also known as Kala Pani, was a notorious prison located in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, a group of islands in the Bay of Bengal. The prison was used by the British colonial government to exile political prisoners, particularly those involved in the Indian independence movement.

Construction of the prison began in 1896 and it was completed in 1906. The prison was designed to hold up to 600 prisoners, but at its peak, it held over 1,500. The prison was made up of individual cells, giving it its name “Cellular Jail.” Each cell measured 13 feet by 7 feet and had a small window that allowed just enough light for the prisoner to see. The prisoners were kept in complete isolation and were not allowed to communicate with one another.

The prison was known for its brutal conditions and the harsh treatment of prisoners. Many prisoners were subjected to hard labor, including working in coal mines and constructing roads. Many also faced physical and psychological torture, including being flogged and being put in solitary confinement for extended periods of time.

One of the most famous prisoners of Cellular Jail was Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, a freedom fighter and writer who was exiled to the Andaman Islands for his involvement in a conspiracy to assassinate the assassination of a British official. Savarkar spent nearly 11 years in Jail and later wrote about his experiences in his book, “The Story of My Transportation for Life.”

Cellular Jail was in use until the 1940s and was finally abandoned in the 1950s. Today, it serves as a national memorial and a reminder of the struggles of India’s freedom fighters. It is open to visitors and offers a glimpse into the harsh conditions of the prison and the sacrifices made by those who fought for India’s independence.

In conclusion, Cellular Jail was a notorious prison that was used by the British colonial government to exile political prisoners, particularly those involved in the Indian independence movement. It was known for its brutal conditions and harsh treatment of prisoners. Many freedom fighters were held in this jail and suffered a lot, but their sacrifices and struggles will always be remembered as a part of India’s freedom struggle. Today, it serves as a national memorial and a reminder of the sacrifices made by those who fought for India’s independence.

History of Cellular Jail

The Cellular Jail, also known as Kala Pani, was a notorious prison located in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in the Bay of Bengal. The prison was built by the British colonial government during the late 19th century to exile political prisoners, particularly those involved in the Indian independence movement.

Construction of the prison began in 1896 and it was completed in 1906. The prison was designed to hold up to 600 prisoners, but at its peak, it held over 1,500. The prison was made up of individual cells, giving it its name “Cellular Jail.” Each cell measured 13 feet by 7 feet and had a small window that allowed just enough light for the prisoner to see. The prisoners were kept in complete isolation and were not allowed to communicate with one another.

The prison was known for its brutal conditions and the harsh treatment of prisoners. Many prisoners were subjected to hard labor, including working in coal mines and constructing roads. Many also faced physical and psychological torture, including being flogged and put in solitary confinement for extended periods of time.

The prison was used to exile political prisoners from all over India, including leaders of the Indian independence movement such as Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, Yogendra Shukla, and Fazl-e-Haq Khairabadi. Many of these prisoners were transported to the Andaman Islands without trial and were forced to serve life sentences in the prison.

During World War II, the Japanese captured the Andaman Islands and the prisoners were released, but the Jail was not used again as a prison and was abandoned in the 1950s.

Today, the Cellular Jail is a national memorial and a reminder of the struggles of India’s freedom fighters. It is open to visitors and offers a glimpse into the harsh conditions of the prison and the sacrifices made by those who fought for India’s independence. The prison has been restored and a light and sound show is held every evening to give visitors an idea of the prison’s history and the sufferings of the freedom fighters.

In conclusion, the Jail was a notorious prison that was used by the British colonial government to exile political prisoners, particularly those involved in the Indian independence movement. It was known for its brutal conditions and harsh treatment of prisoners. Many freedom fighters were held in this jail and suffered a lot, but their sacrifices and struggles will always be remembered as a part of India’s freedom struggle. Today, it serves as a national memorial and a reminder of the sacrifices made by those who fought for India’s independence.

Cellular Jail Light and Sound show

The Cellular Jail Light and Sound show is a popular tourist attraction held at the Jail National Memorial in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The show is held every evening and provides visitors with an interactive experience of the history and significance of the prison.

The show is a combination of light and sound effects that are used to depict the prison’s history and the struggles of the freedom fighters who were held there. The show starts with a brief history of the Andaman Islands and the role of the Cellular Jail in the Indian independence movement. It then moves on to depict the harsh conditions of the prison, including the isolation and punishment of prisoners.

The show also features a reenactment of the experiences of some of the most famous prisoners of the jail, such as Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, who spent nearly 11 years in prison and later wrote about his experiences in his book, “The Story of My Transportation for Life.”

The show is held in the open-air auditorium and visitors can sit and watch the show. The atmosphere is quite emotive and it gives a lot of information about the history of the jail. The show is in the local language and English as well, so visitors can understand the history and significance of the prison easily.

In conclusion, the Cellular Jail Light and Sound show is a popular tourist attraction held at the Cellular Jail National Memorial in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The show is a combination of light and sound effects that are used to depict the prison’s history and the struggles of the freedom fighters who were held there. It provides visitors with an interactive and emotive experience of the history and significance of the prison and the sacrifices made by India’s freedom fighters.

Facts About Cellular Jail

  1. The Cellular Jail, also known as Kala Pani, was a notorious prison located in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in the Bay of Bengal.
  2. The prison was built by the British colonial government during the late 19th century to exile political prisoners, particularly those involved in the Indian independence movement.
  3. Construction of the prison began in 1896 and it was completed in 1906. The prison was designed to hold up to 600 prisoners, but at its peak, it held over 1,500.
  4. The prison was made up of individual cells, giving it its name “Cellular Jail.” Each cell measured 13 feet by 7 feet and had a small window that allowed just enough light for the prisoner to see. The prisoners were kept in complete isolation and were not allowed to communicate with one another.
  5. Many prisoners were subjected to hard labor, including working in coal mines and constructing roads. Many also faced physical and psychological torture, including being flogged and put in solitary confinement for extended periods of time.
  6. The prison was used to exile political prisoners from all over India, including leaders of the Indian independence movement such as Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, Yogendra Shukla, and Fazl-e-Haq Khairabadi.
  7. During World War II, the Japanese captured the Andaman Islands and the prisoners were released, but the Cellular Jail was not used again as a prison and was abandoned in the 1950s.
  8. Today, the Cellular Jail is a national memorial and a reminder of the struggles of India’s freedom fighters. It is open to visitors and offers a glimpse into the harsh conditions of the prison and the sacrifices made by those who fought for India’s independence.
  9. The Cellular Jail Light and Sound show is a popular tourist attraction held at the Cellular Jail National Memorial in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The show is held every evening and provides visitors with an interactive experience of the history and significance of the prison.
  10. The Cellular Jail is a UNESCO World Heritage site and is considered one of the most important historical sites in India.

How to Reach Cellular Jail

There are several ways to reach Cellular Jail:

  1. By Air: The nearest airport to Jail is Veer Savarkar International Airport, located in Port Blair, which is well connected to major cities in India such as Kolkata, Chennai, and Delhi. From the airport, visitors can take a taxi or local bus to reach the Cellular Jail.
  2. By Ship: Visitors can also reach Jail by taking a ship from Kolkata, Chennai, or Vizag to Port Blair. The journey takes around 3-4 days. From Port Blair, visitors can take a taxi or local bus to reach the Cellular Jail.
  3. By Road: Cellular Jail is located at a distance of about 5 km from the city center of Port Blair. Taxis, auto-rickshaws, and local buses are available to reach the Cellular Jail from Port Blair.

It is important to note that the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are a Union Territory of India, and visitors must have a valid permit to visit the islands. The permit can be obtained from the Indian Embassy in your country or from the immigration office in Port Blair upon arrival.

In conclusion, the Jail is located in Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India, and can be reached by air, ship, or road. Veer Savarkar International Airport in Port Blair is the nearest airport and the city is well-connected to major cities in India. Visitors can also reach the island by ship from Kolkata, Chennai, or Vizag. The Cellular Jail is located at a distance of about 5 km from the city center of Port Blair and can be reached by taxi, auto-rickshaws, and local buses.

Tickets and Timings of Cellular Jail

  1. Tickets: Visitors to the Cellular Jail National Memorial can purchase tickets at the entrance of the memorial. The ticket prices may vary, but as of my knowledge cutoff, the entry fee for Indian citizens is Rs. 20 per person and for foreign citizens is Rs. 200 per person. Children under the age of 15 are admitted free of charge.
  2. Timings: The Jail National Memorial is open to visitors every day except on Monday. The visiting hours are from 9:00 am to 12:30 pm and from 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm. The Light and Sound Show is held every evening, usually starting at 6:00 pm and the duration is around one hour.
  3. Light and Sound Show: The Light and Sound Show is a popular tourist attraction held at the Cellular Jail National Memorial in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The show is held every evening and provides visitors with an interactive experience of the history and significance of the prison. The show is held in local languages as well as in English. The show starts at 6:00 pm, and tickets can be purchased separately for the show.

It is important to note that the timings and ticket prices may vary depending on the season, and visitors should check the official website or contact the memorial for the most up-to-date information.

In conclusion, the Cellular Jail National Memorial is open to visitors every day except on Monday, and the visiting hours are from 9:00 am to 12:30 pm and from 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm. Visitors can purchase tickets at the entrance of the memorial, the entry fee for Indian citizens is Rs. 20 per person and for foreign citizens is Rs. 200 per person. Children under the age of 15 are admitted free of charge. The Light and Sound Show is held every evening, usually starting at 6:00 pm the duration is around one hour and tickets can be purchased separately for the show.

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Frequently Asked Questions About Cellular Jail

Q: Where is the Cellular Jail located?

A: The Cellular Jail, also known as Kala Pani, is located in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in the Bay of Bengal.

Q: When was the Cellular Jail built?

A: Construction of the Cellular Jail began in 1896 and it was completed in 1906.

Q: What was the purpose of the Cellular Jail?

A: The Cellular Jail was built by the British colonial government to exile political prisoners, particularly those involved in the Indian independence movement.

Q: How were the prisoners kept in the Cellular Jail?

A: The prisoners in the Cellular Jail were kept in individual cells and were not allowed to communicate with one another. They were kept in complete isolation.

Q: What were the conditions like in the Cellular Jail?

A: The conditions in the Cellular Jail were brutal. Many prisoners were subjected to hard labor, including working in coal mines and constructing roads. Many also faced physical and psychological torture, including being flogged and put in solitary confinement for extended periods of time.

Q: Who were some of the famous prisoners of the Cellular Jail?

A: Some of the famous prisoners of the Cellular Jail include Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, Yogendra Shukla, and Fazl-e-Haq Khairabadi.

Q: What happened to the Cellular Jail during World War II?

A: During World War II, the Japanese captured the Andaman Islands and the prisoners were released, but the Cellular Jail was not used again as a prison and was abandoned in the 1950s.

Q: What is the Cellular Jail used for today?

A: Today, the Cellular Jail is a national memorial and a reminder of the struggles of India’s freedom fighters. It is open to visitors and offers a glimpse into the harsh conditions of the prison and the sacrifices made by those who fought for India’s independence.

Q: Is there a light and sound show at the Cellular Jail?

A: Yes, there is a popular light and sound show held at the Cellular Jail every evening, which provides visitors with an interactive experience of the history and significance of the prison.

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